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Finding help in Peterborough

The area of welfare benefits is always going to be a difficult advice topic to navigate. The benefit laws are both complex and complicated. DIAL Peterborough would always advocate seeking specialist advice before applying for any benefits. The Dial Peterborough provides telephone and face to face advice to physically disabled clients whom have welfare benefit problems, and also representation; depending upon our availability at that time.The agencies below can offer some help, phone for details:

Please click on the links below to get detailed further information

  • DIAL Peterborough (physical disability) 01733 265551
  • Peterborough Age UK (over age 55) 01733 564185
  • PCVS (learning disability) 01733 342654
  • Peterborough and Fenland Mind (mental health) 01733 530651
  • CAB (general) 08444994120 who give assistance with the new Peterborough Community Assistance Scheme PCAS (Please note no help with benefit claim form filling, no home visits, no appeal representation and very limited case work)

Peterborough City Council (benefits appeal work only, not Housing Benefit or Council Tax Benefit) 01733 747474 ask to be put through to the benefits worker

Benefits for Disabled People

PIP Personal Independence Payment  helps with some of the extra costs caused by long-term ill-health or a disability if you’re aged 16 to 64.

You could get between £21 to £134.40 a week to help with the extra costs caused by your condition. How much you get is not based on your condition, but how your condition affects you.

You’ll need an assessment to work out the level of help you get. Your award will be regularly reassessed to make sure you’re getting the right support.

If you get Disability Living Allowance

PIP started to replace Disability Living Allowance (DLA) for people aged 16 to 64 from 8 April 2013.

Use the PIP checker to find out if and when PIP affects your DLA.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) daily living component points scores

To get an award of the daily living component, you need to score:

8 points for the standard rate
12 points for the enhanced rate

For daily living, the points need to be scored from activities 1-10 above.

You can only score one set of points from each activity, if two or more apply from the same activity only the highest will count.  So, for example, if:

4  d. Needs assistance to groom.  2 points
4  g. Needs assistance to bathe.  4 points

both apply you will receive only the 4 points for the ‘Bathing and grooming’ activity.  These can then be added to points for other activities, such as ‘Dressing and undressing’

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) Mobility Component Points Scores

To get an award of the mobility component you need to score:

8 points for the standard rate
12 points for the enhanced rate

For mobility, the points need to be scored from mobility activities 1-2 above.

As with daily living above, you only score the highest points that apply to you from each activity, but you can add points from activities 1 and 2 together to reach your final total.

DAILY LIVING ACTIVITIES

1. Preparing food.
a. Can prepare and cook a simple meal unaided.  0 points.
b. Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to either prepare or cook a simple meal.  2 points.
c. Cannot cook a simple meal using a conventional cooker but is able to do so using a microwave. points. 2 points
d. Needs prompting to be able to either prepare or cook a simple meal.  2 points.
e. Needs supervision or assistance to either prepare or cook a simple meal.  4 points.
f. Cannot prepare and cook food.  8 points.

2. Taking nutrition.
a. Can take nutrition unaided.  0 points.
b. Needs –
(i) to use an aid or appliance to  be able to take nutrition; or
(ii) supervision to be able to take nutrition; or
(iii) assistance to be able to cut up food.  2 points.
c. Needs a therapeutic source to be able to take nutrition.  2 points.
d. Needs prompting to be able to take nutrition.  4 points.
e. Needs assistance to be able to manage a therapeutic source to take nutrition.  6 points.
f. Cannot convey food and drink to their mouth and needs another person to do so.  10 points.

3. Managing therapy or monitoring a health condition.
a. Either –
(i) does not receive medication or therapy or need to monitor a health condition; or
(ii) can manage medication or therapy or monitor a health condition unaided.  0 points.
b. Needs either –
(i) to use an aid or appliance to  be able to manage medication; or
(ii) supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage medication or monitor
a health condition.  1 point.
c. Needs supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage therapy that takes no more than 3.5 hours a week.  2 points.
d. Needs supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage therapy that takes more than 3.5 but no more than 7 hours a week.  4 points.
e. Needs supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage therapy that takes more than 7 but no more than 14 hours a week.  6 points.
f. Needs supervision, prompting or assistance to be able to manage therapy that takes more than 14 hours a week.  8 points.

4. Washing and bathing.
a. Can wash and bathe unaided.  0 points.
b. Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to wash or bathe.  2 points.
c. Needs supervision or prompting to be able to wash or bathe.  2 points.
d. Needs assistance to be able to wash either their hair or body below the waist.  2 points.
e. Needs assistance to be able to get in or out of a bath or shower.  3 points.
f. Needs assistance to be able to wash their body between the shoulders and waist.  4 points.
g. Cannot wash and bathe at all and needs another person to wash their entire body.  8 points.

5. Managing toilet needs or incontinence.
a. Can manage toilet needs or  incontinence unaided.  0 points.
b. Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to manage toilet needs or incontinence.  2 points.
c. Needs supervision or prompting to be able to manage toilet needs.  2 points.
d. Needs assistance to be able to manage toilet needs.  4 points.
e. Needs assistance to be able to manage incontinence of either bladder or bowel.  6 points.
f. Needs assistance to be able to manage incontinence of both bladder and bowel.  8 points.

6. Dressing and undressing.
a. Can dress and undress unaided.  0 points.
b. Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to dress or undress.  2 points.
c. Needs either -
(i) prompting to be able to dress, undress or determine appropriate circumstances for remaining clothed; or
(ii) prompting or assistance to be able to select appropriate clothing.  2 points.
d. Needs assistance to be able to dress or undress their lower body.  2 points.
e. Needs assistance to be able to dress or undress their upper body.  4 points.
f. Cannot dress or undress at  all.  8 points.

7. Communicating verbally.
a. Can express and understand verbal information unaided.  0 points.
b. Needs to use an aid or appliance to be able to speak or hear.  2 points.
c. Needs communication support to be able to express or understand complex verbal information.  4 points.
d. Needs communication support to be able to express or understand basic verbal information.  8 points.
e. Cannot express or understand verbal information at all even with communication support.  12 points.

8. Reading and understanding signs, symbols and words.
a. Can read and understand basic and complex written information either unaided or using spectacles or contact lenses.  0 points.
b. Needs to use an aid or appliance, other than spectacles or contact lenses, to be able to read or understand either basic or complex written information.  2 points.
c. Needs prompting to be able to read or understand complex written information.  2 points.
d. Needs prompting to be able to read or understand basic written information.  4 points.
e. Cannot read or understand signs, symbols or words at all.  8 points.

9. Engaging with other people face to face.
a. Can engage with other people unaided.  0 points.
b. Needs prompting to be able to engage with other people.  2 points.
c. Needs social support to be able to engage with other people.  4 points.
d. Cannot engage with other people due to such engagement causing either –
(i) overwhelming
psychological distress to the claimant; or
(ii) the claimant to exhibit behaviour which would result in a substantial risk of harm to the claimant or another person. 8 points.

10. Making budgeting decisions.
a. Can manage complex  budgeting decisions unaided.  0 points.
b. Needs prompting or assistance to be able to make complex budgeting decisions.  2 points.
c. Needs prompting or assistance to be able to make simple budgeting decisions.  4 points.
d. Cannot make any budgeting decisions at all.  6 points.

MOBILITY ACTIVITIES

1. Planning and following journeys.
a. Can plan and follow the route of a journey unaided.  0 points.
b. Needs prompting to be able to undertake any journey to avoid overwhelming psychological distress to the claimant.  4 points.
c. Cannot plan the route of a journey.  8 points.
d. Cannot follow the route of an unfamiliar journey without another person, assistance dog or orientation aid.  10 points.
e. Cannot undertake any journey because it would cause overwhelming psychological distress to the claimant.  10 points.
f. Cannot follow the route of a familiar journey without another person, an assistance dog or an orientation aid.  12 points.

2. Moving around.
a. Can stand and then move more than 200 metres, either aided or unaided.  0 points.
b. Can stand and then move more than 50 metres but no more than 200 metres, either aided or unaided.  4 points.
c. Can stand and then move unaided more than 20 metres but no more than 50 metres.  8 points.
d. Can stand and then move using an aid or appliance more than 20 metres but no more than 50 metres.  10 points.
e. Can stand and then move more than 1 metre but no more than 20 metres, either aided or unaided.  12 points.
f. Cannot, either aided or unaided, –
(i) stand; or
(ii) move more than 1 metre.  12 points.

Additional Information:

Variable and fluctuating conditions

Taking a view of ability over a longer period of time helps to iron out fluctuations and presents a more coherent picture of disabling effects. Therefore the descriptor choice should be based on consideration of a 12 month period.

Scoring descriptors will apply to individuals where their impairment(s) affects their ability to complete an activity on more than 50 per cent of days in the 12 month period. The following rules apply:

If one descriptor in an activity applies on more than 50 per cent of the days in the period – i.e. the activity cannot be completed in the way described on more than 50 per cent of days – then that descriptor should be chosen.

If more than one descriptor in an activity applies on more than 50 per cent of the days in the period, then the descriptor chosen should be the one which applies for the greatest proportion of the time.

Where one single descriptor in an activity is not satisfied on more than 50 per cent of days, but a number of different descriptors in that activity together are satisfied on more than 50 per cent of days – for example, descriptor ‘B’ is satisfied on 40 per cent of days and descriptor ‘C’ on 30 per cent of days – the descriptor satisfied for the highest proportion of the time should be selected.

Awaiting treatment
If someone is awaiting treatment or further intervention it can be difficult to accurately predict its level of success or whether it will even occur. Descriptor choices should therefore be based on the likely continuing impact of the health condition or impairment as if any treatment or further intervention has not occurred.

Reliably, in a timely fashion, repeatedly and safely
An individual must be able to complete an activity descriptor reliably, in a timely fashion, repeatedly and safely; and where indicated, using aids and appliances or with support from another person (or, for activity 10, a support dog). Otherwise they should be considered unable to complete the activity described at that level.

Reliably means to a reasonable standard.

In a timely fashion means in less than twice the time it would take for an individual without any impairment.

Repeatedly means completed as often during the day as the individual activity requires. Consideration needs to be given to the cumulative effects of symptoms such as pain and fatigue – i.e. whether completing the activity adversely affects the individual’s ability to subsequently complete other activities.

Safely means in a fashion that is unlikely to cause harm to the individual, either directly or through vulnerability to the actions of others; or to another person.

Risk and Safety
When considering whether an activity can be undertaken safely it is important to consider the risk of a serious adverse event occurring. However, the risk that a serious adverse event may occur due to impairments is insufficient – there has to be evidence that if the activity was undertaken, the adverse event is likely to occur.

Aids and appliances
The assessment will take some account of aids and appliances which are used in everyday life. In this context:

Aids are devices that help a performance of a function, for example, walking sticks or spectacles.

Appliances are devices that provide or replace a missing function, for example artificial limbs, collecting devices (stomas) and wheelchairs.

The assessment will take into account aids and appliances that individuals normally use and low cost, commonly available ones which someone with their impairment might reasonably be expected to use, even if they are not normally used.

Individuals who use or could reasonably be expected to use aids to carry out an activity will generally receive a higher scoring descriptor than those who can carry out the activity unaided.

Support dogs
We recognise that guide, hearing and dual sensory dogs are not ‘aids’ but have attempted to ensure that the descriptors capture the additional barriers and costs of needing such a dog where they are required to enable individuals to follow a journey safely.

Support from other people
The assessment will take into account where individuals need the support of another person or persons to carry out an activity – including where that person has to carry out the activity for them in its entirety. The criteria refer to three types of support:

Assistance is support that requires the presence and physical intervention of another person i.e. actually doing some or all of the task in question. This specifically excludes non-physical intervention such as prompting or supervision which are defined below. To apply, this only needs to be required for part of the activity.

Prompting is support provided by reminding or encouraging an individual to undertake or complete a task but not physically helping them. To apply, this only needs to be required for part of the activity.

Supervision is a need for the continuous presence of another person to avoid a serious adverse event from occurring to the individual. There must be evidence that any risk would be likely to occur in the absence of such supervision. To apply, this must be required for the full duration of the activity.

Unaided
Within the assessment criteria, the ability to perform an activity ‘unaided’ means without either the use of aids or appliances or assistance/prompting/supervision from another person.

Epilepsy
Epilepsy is a marked example of a fluctuating condition where an individual can have no functional limitation one minute and considerable limitation the next. Assessment should be based on the impact this causes.

Key to assessing individuals with epilepsy is the consideration of risk. Within each activity, the relevant descriptor should apply to a person with epilepsy if there is evidence that a serious adverse event is likely to occur if the person carried out the activity in that descriptor. It is essential to consider the likely effects of any seizure – type and frequency of fit, associated behaviour, the post-ictal phase and whether there is likely to be sufficient warning to mitigate any risk of danger.

Help with PIP

We strongly advise to get in contact with the advice agencies listed above, however if you can not get an appointment then follow the link for a guide to filling the form PIP Guide

How to claim PIP

You must meet all of the following criteria;

  • Age 16 to 64
  • Must have had the care/mobility need for last 3 months and expect it to last for next 9 months (forward and backward rules)
  • Not already in receipt of DLA
  • Phone DWP   0800 917 2222  for initial telephone assessment

Information you will be asked for

  • contact details and date of birth
  • National Insurance number
  • bank or building society details
  • doctor’s or health worker’s name
  • details of any time  spent abroad or in a care home or hospital

Someone else can call on your behalf, but will need to be with them when they call. You can also write asking for a form to send the above information by post (this can delay claim).

Address                                                                                                                       Freepost RTBS/CB YC/SCZS,                                                                                               DWP PIP (1) Warbreck House,                                                                                             Warbreck Hill,                                                                                                                         Blackpool   FY2 OUZ

What happens next

You will be sent a form asking you to describe how your condition affects you. The form comes with notes to help you fill it in. Return the form to DWP – the address is on the form.

  • Have 4 weeks to fill in form
  • Can request 2 week extension
  • The majority of claimants will need a medical assessment to complete application process.

We strongly advise that you get experienced help to fill in the application forms, DIAL can offer this service to physically disabled people who pay their council tax to Peterborough City Council, please ring 01733 265551 for an appointment

Helpline for on-going PIP claims – 08458503322

Benefits Listed in alphabetical order

  • access to work find out how this scheme can offer support/equipment and help with travel costs for working disabled people- access to work.
  • attendance allowance a tax free benefit for disabled people aged 65 or over for help with personal care needs and are not already in the receipt of DLA/PIP- attendance allowance.
  • bereavement benefits benefits and allowances that can be claimed when someone dies- bereavement benefits.
  • blue badge scheme  parking concessions for disabled people - blue badge scheme.
  • carer’s allowance benefits for carers- carer’s allowance..
  • child benefit extra income for families with children- child benefit and guardian’s allowance.
  • cinema tickets - You can get a Cinema Exhibitors’ Association Card (CEAC) to get a free ticket for anyone accompanying you to the cinema. To get this card you will either have to be in receipt of disability living allowance or attendance allowance or be a registered blind person. You can find out more by telephoning 0845 123 1292 (Fax: 0845 123 1296 Minicom / Text phone: 0845 123 1297) or fromwww.ceacard.co.uk/.
  • council tax support -   PCC online information and application forms
  • disability living allowance - extra financial help for disabled people who have care/mobility needs (also see PIP section) - disability living allowance.
  • disabled person’s railcard -You can get a railcard if you have a visual impairment or epilepsy or are getting attendance allowance, disability living allowance (if you are getting the higher rate or lower rate mobility component or the higher or middle rate care component), personal independence payment,  severe disablement allowance, war pensioner’s mobility supplement, war/service disablement pension (for 80% or more disability) or are buying or leasing a vehicle through the Motability scheme. For more information see www.disabledpersons-railcard.co.uk/what-is-a-disabled-persons-railcard.
  • education benefits - free school meals for your children school meal application
  • education grants - find out what grants are available for disabled students - grants for students aged 16 and over in school and further education.
  • employment and support allowance - a benefit for disabled people who are unable/find it difficult to work – ESA information and application form
  • help with heating/insulation/boilers - find out what extra help is available  money advice heating
  • housing benefit - information and application forms (including “Bedroom Tax”) - housing benefit and calculate and application form for Peterborough
  • housing grants - general information on applying for Disabled Facilities Grants - housing grants and local information 
  • in work credit - See Factsheet F50 - how to claim your in work benefits.
  • income support - See Factsheet F45 - income support.
  • industrial injuries benefits - These are payable if you have suffered an industrial injury or have a prescribed industrial disease. In addition to a basic disablement benefit there are also additional benefits to cover reduced earnings or the need for constant attendance. See ourdisability rights handbook or www.gov.uk/industrial-injuries-disablement-benefit.
  • job grant - see Factsheet F50 - how to claim your in work benefits.
  • jobseeker’s allowance - Factsheet F46 - jobseeker’s allowance.
  • local authority help - If you feel that you require practical support to carry out day-to-day tasks because have a disability or are suffering from a long–term health condition, then you have the right to be assessed for help from your local authority. Your local authority can also provide help if your child has these needs or support if you are providing care. See Factsheet F2 - steps to getting an assessment from social services.
  • local welfare provision - From April 2013 community care grants and crisis loans for general living expenses (including rent in advance) will be abolished and replaced by a new local provision administered by local authorities in England and the devolved administrations in Scotland and Wales. The local scheme in Peterborough is Peterborough Community Assistance Scheme. PCAS .
  • maternity benefits - see our Factsheet F42 - maternity, paternity and adoption benefits.
  • motability - see Factsheet F17 - the motability scheme.
  • national health service benefits - see Factsheet F14 - prescription charges/health benefits.
  • pension credit - see Factsheet F12 - pension credit.
  • personal independence payment - see Factsheet F60 - personal independence payment.
  • retirement pension - This is a contributory benefit which is paid to you when you reach retirement age. Your pension can be based on National Insurance contributions which you have paid or those paid by your spouse or civil partner. You can calculate your retirement date at state pension age calculator to find out your retirement date -www.gov.uk/calculate-state-pension. You can find out more in ourdisability rights handbook or from www.gov.uk/state-pension/eligibility.
  • return to work credit - See Factsheet F50 - how to claim your in work benefits.
  • road tax disc - You can get a free tax disc if you get the enhanced mobility component of personal independence payment (PIP), the higher rate mobility component of disability living allowance, or are getting war pensioners mobility supplement/armed forces independence payment or have an invalid carriage. You can also get a 50 per cent discount on your road tax if you receive the standard mobility component of PIP. For more information seewww.gov.uk/driving-medical-conditions/tax-disc-exemptions orwww.disabledmotoring.org/motoring/road-tax-exemption. See also Factsheet F17 - the motability scheme.
  • social fund - see Factsheet F41 - the social fund.
  • statutory sick pay - You can get statutory sick pay (SSP) for up to 28 weeks if you have a job but have been sick and unable to work for 4 consecutive days. You do not have to have paid national insurance contributions but you cannot get statutory sick pay if your gross earnings are less than £97 a week. The amount of savings you have does not affect your SSP. This benefit is paid by your employer. For more information see our disability rights handbook.
  • tax credits - See Factsheet F9 - a guide to tax credits.
  • tv licence concessions - You can get a TV licence at a reduced cost if you are aged 75 and over, a care home resident or blind/severely sight impaired. For more information see our disability rights handbookor the tv licensing website.
  • universal credit (from October 2013) – See Factsheet F55 - universal credit
  • vat exemptions - If you are disabled you don’t have to pay VAT when you buy equipment that has been designed solely for disabled people or which has been adapted for your use. You will also not be charged VAT on certain services provided. This includes building work to adapt your home and the hire of disability equipment like wheelchairs. For more information about this see HM Revenue and Customs leaflet 701/7 - VAT reliefs for disabled people.
  • war pensions - There are two different war pension schemes in operation. The old scheme applies where someone has an injury, illness or death caused, whilst in the armed forces, before 6 April 2005. If you want to find out about the old war pensions scheme, see Disability Rights UK’s Disability Rights Handbook 35th Edition, which was published May 2010.The new Armed Forces Compensation Scheme (AFCS) was replaces the old war pensions scheme for injuries, illnesses or death caused, whilst in the armed forces, on or after 6 April 2005. You can find out more about the new scheme in our disability rights handbook. You can also find out more information about both schemes of get a claim form by calling the Veterans Helpline on 0800 169 2277 or going to Veterans Info.
  • Watersure scheme - see Factsheet F58 - the watersure scheme.